Stevie Dix: Limited-edition print

Edition of 25

Our third limited edition release introduces an exclusive Lithograph print by Belgian painter Stevie Dix, titled Getting your Meds. Depicting a motif from a painting Dix exhibited in her latest solo show in New York, her first-ever print edition displays an array of vibrant tones of indigo and lilac. This work is an exceptional example of the artist's introspective and symbolistic style.

Getting your Meds

Lithograph (Edition of 25)

  • Getting your Meds
  • Getting your Meds
  • Getting your Meds
  • Getting your Meds

Stevie Dix

Getting your Meds

Regular price
Frame:

Date
2022

Dimensions
60 x 47 cm (framed)
57 x 44 cm (unframed)

Medium
4-colour Lithograph on paper

Edition size
25
Each work is signed, dated and numbered by the artist.

Framing option
The framed option comes mounted on acid-free board in a hand-made alder frame.

”This work based on a painting from my most recent solo show in New York with the Journal Gallery. It was titled Getting your Meds and the title was meant to reflect the humour in that need to dress up to provoke or feel alive, especially within a mundane life. I painted it loosely based on a photograph of some trousers that were listed on ebay. Velvet wranglers, to be specific.”
— Stevie Dix

Stevie Dix

Stevie Dix’s oils on canvas are bold and gestural, composed in an essential style where simple objects and minimalistic compositions are elevated to symbols and metaphors for intimate feelings and, at times, political perspectives. Growing up in a household of artists, Dix spent a lot of her days in her mother’s studio learning to sew costumes and to draw and paint. By translating introspection into a coming-of-age theme, she aims to hit a universal nerve, drawing influence from the Belgian Surrealists and the Chicago Imagists.

”It was the only print form I’d never tried before and it’s also the mother of all printing forms, isn’t it? I don’t know whether it’s true but I feel like it’s the big one. The serious one. And also being a painter I felt like it was going to be a great feeling that I could really paint onto the stone and I could make the image directly. I loved it, it felt very comfortable.”
— Stevie Dix